Leland Management Community Spring Isle Gets a New Guardhouse

Day one of the Sring Isle Guardhouse Construction Project was a success! Check out the picture of the relocation of the current Guardhouse by TEM Systems (relocating the Access Control System) and ATT (relocating the phone lines). The crews worked hard to get this portion done in one day so that the relocated guardhouse was fully functional within 24 hours.

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Leland Management Finalist for Best Places to Work 2012

For the second consecutive year Leland Management has been selected by the Orlando Business Journal as a finalist in the 2012 Best Places to Work Award.  This is a special award for Leland Management, as the Finalists are determined by the employees.  The Orlando Business Journal surveys the employees of each company nominated on the  following areas: team effectiveness, retention risk, alignment with goals, trust with co-workers, individual contribution, manager effectiveness, trust in senior leaders, feeling valued, work engagement and people practices.  Four companies in each division that have the best survey results become finalists, one company, selected from the four finalists becomes the Best Place to Work for 2012.

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7 Deadly Community Website Sins

Leland Management is currently working on updating our corporate website and working with our communities that want to update their websites.  This article posted by AtHomeNet provides great information when looking at creating or updating a community website.


AtHomeNet Blog 360

If your community has a website or is thinking about setting one up, please keep these “deadly sins” in mind in order to make sure your website is a huge success with your residents and board.

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Team work

“Coming together is a beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success” ~ Henry Ford

Much of Leland Management’s success can be attributed to the “Team” of individuals completing the day to day tasks of community association management.  From the beginning, Rebecca and David Furlow, owners of Leland Management, have placed a high importance not only on hiring and retaining the best and brightest individuals, but on creating strong, functional teams.   As a result, not only do the employees of Leland benefit, the associations that Leland manages benefit as well.  Each association has the benefit of having multiple team members work on their account allowing for a natural collaborative and internal review process.  Additionally, because teamwork is fostered and rewarded at Leland Management, it is not unusual to see employees pitching in to help out others (outside their groups), coming together to support a local charity,  or just offering kind words and support to one another.   For Leland Management, the results are outstanding: strong teams, happy employees, outstanding customer service…all leading to happy customers.

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Members of the “Leland Team” working together on a team building project.

There is an Alligator in My Pond, Oh My!

At Leland Management many of the communities we manage contain water features such as ponds or lakes and it is not unusual to spot an alligator living in those areas. While our gator friends are not usually aggressive, they can at times be very dangerous especially to pets and small children.    The following tips  have been prepared by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission to keep you and your family safe from unwanted alligators in your community.

  • Be aware of the possibility of alligators when you are in or near fresh or brackish water. Bites may occur when people do not pay close enough attention to their surroundings when working or recreating near water.
  •  Do not swim outside of posted swimming areas or in waters that might be inhabited by large alligators.
  •  Alligators are most active between dusk and dawn. Therefore, avoid swimming at night.
  •  Dogs and cats are similar in size to the natural prey of alligators. Don’t allow pets to swim, exercise or drink in or near waters that may contain alligators. Dogs often attract an alligator’s interest, so do not swim with your dog.
  • Leave alligators alone. State law prohibits killing, harassing or possessing alligators. Handling even small alligators can result in injury.
  • Never feed alligators – it’s dangerous and illegal. When fed, alligators can overcome their natural wariness and learn to associate people with food. When this happens, some of these alligators have to be removed and killed.
  • Dispose of fish scraps in garbage cans at boat ramps and fish camps. Do not throw them into the water. Although you are not intentionally feeding alligators when you do this, the result can be the same.
  •  Seek immediate medical attention if you are bitten by an alligator. Alligator bites can result in serious infections.
  • Observe and photograph alligators only from a distance. Remember, they’re an important part of Florida’s natural history as well as an integral component of aquatic ecosystems.

For more information visit myfwc.com/media/152524/Alligator_Brochure.pdf.

At Leland Manag…

At Leland Management many of the communities we manage contain water features such as ponds or lakes and it is not unusual to spot an alligator living in those areas. While our gator friends are not usually aggressive, they can at times be very dangerous especially to pets and small children.    The following tips  have been prepared by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission to keep you and your family safe from unwanted alligators in your community.

  • Be aware of the possibility of alligators when you are in or near fresh or brackish water. Bites may occur when people do not pay close enough attention to their surroundings when working or recreating near water.
  •  Do not swim outside of posted swimming areas or in waters that might be inhabited by large alligators.
  •  Alligators are most active between dusk and dawn. Therefore, avoid swimming at night.
  •  Dogs and cats are similar in size to the natural prey of alligators. Don’t allow pets to swim, exercise or drink in or near waters that may contain alligators. Dogs often attract an alligator’s interest, so do not swim with your dog.
  • Leave alligators alone. State law prohibits killing, harassing or possessing alligators. Handling even small alligators can result in injury.
  • Never feed alligators – it’s dangerous and illegal. When fed, alligators can overcome their natural wariness and learn to associate people with food. When this happens, some of these alligators have to be removed and killed.
  • Dispose of fish scraps in garbage cans at boat ramps and fish camps. Do not throw them into the water. Although you are not intentionally feeding alligators when you do this, the result can be the same.
  •  Seek immediate medical attention if you are bitten by an alligator. Alligator bites can result in serious infections.
  • Observe and photograph alligators only from a distance. Remember, they’re an important part of Florida’s natural history as well as an integral component of aquatic ecosystems.

For more information visit myfwc.com/media/152524/Alligator_Brochure.pdf.

Leland Management Superstar, Dustin Heaton

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Meet Leland Management’s current Superstar, Dustin Heaton.  Dustin is an Accounting Manager who has been working at Leland Management for 3 years.  Prior to Leland he worked in Houston for a mortgage company.  Things Dustin enjoys most about working at Leland are participating in the team activities and working with all of the Leland staff members.  When not working, Dustin spends time, “hanging out” , participating in mixed martial arts, training, going to the beach and riding his motorcycle.   Dustin has proven to be a tremendous asset to the Leland Team, please join us in congratulating him for being this month’s Superstar.

Leland Management Asks, Are You Ready for A Hurricane?

At Leland Management we deal with thousands of homeowners in hundreds of communities day in and out.  Being in Florida (on both the east and west coast) for over 15 years, we also have dealt with our share of  hurricanes and severe storms hitting the areas where the communities we manage are located.  Experience indicates that residents fair hurricanes and storms much better when they create and follow a hurricane preparedness plan.  FEMA has published  the following list of things to do before a hurricane on their website http://www.ready.gov.   This list talks about what to do to be prepared for a hurricane.

To prepare for a hurricane, you should take the following measures:

  • To begin preparing, you should build an emergency kitand make a family communications plan.
  • Know your surroundings.
  • Learn the elevation level of your property and whether the land is flood-prone. This will help you know how your property will be affected when storm surge or tidal flooding are forecasted.
  • Identify levees and dams in your area and determine whether they pose a hazard to you.
  • Learn community hurricane evacuation routes and how to find higher ground. Determine where you would go and how you would get there if you needed to evacuate.
  • Make plans to secure your property:
  • Cover all of your home’s windows. Permanent storm shutters offer the best protection for windows. A second option is to board up windows with 5/8” marine plywood, cut to fit and ready to install. Tape does not prevent windows from breaking.
  • Install straps or additional clips to securely fasten your roof to the frame structure. This will reduce roof damage.
  • Be sure trees and shrubs around your home are well trimmed so they are more wind resistant.
  • Clear loose and clogged rain gutters and downspouts.
  • Reinforce your garage doors; if wind enters a garage it can cause dangerous and expensive structural damage.
  • Plan to bring in all outdoor furniture, decorations, garbage cans and anything else that is not tied down.
  • Determine how and where to secure your boat.
  • Install a generator for emergencies.
  • If in a high-rise building, be prepared to take shelter on or below the 10th floor.

For more information on what to do to prepare yourself and home for a hurricane visit http://www.ready.gov/hurricanes